Recent Posts

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21
General Discussion / Re: Single foot vs. snake line guides
« Last post by bluegillbob on August 16, 2014, 08:14:31 AM »
Thank you both for the answers. Maybe it's a nostalgia thing; the appearance of a fly rod seems to remain with little change. Maybe the manufacturers and customers prefer the traditional looks of a fly rod.

Peace,

Robert
22
General Discussion / Re: Single foot vs. snake line guides
« Last post by Tom Jindra on August 16, 2014, 06:18:13 AM »
I suspect Robert was referring not to the ceramic single-foot guides, but to the more modern single-foot snake guides.

If he was asking about the ceramics, the answer is easy: They're terrible. Ceramics are much heavier than double-foot snakes, they are much more fragile, they are expensive and they gain you nothing.
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General Discussion / Re: Single foot vs. snake line guides
« Last post by albcorb on August 16, 2014, 02:55:05 AM »
Although it is minimal single foot guides are more expensive. The difference in the weight is negligible as the single foot guides weigh more(stamped steel and ceramic ring) than snake guides(bent wire) and offset the lesser wraps and epoxy. They do take less time to wrap and finish though. As for staying in place I've had no issues with single foot guides on fly rods, spinning rods or casting rods.
a good fit up and finish goes a long way.
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General Discussion / Re: Single foot vs. snake line guides
« Last post by Tom Jindra on August 15, 2014, 08:00:21 PM »
Good question.

I can't tell you why some companies choose single-foot guides while others use double-foot guides, because I've never bothered to ask. I can only share my own opinion/bias, which is: I don't trust single-foot guides to stay in place.

Whether that's fair, I don't honestly know. I can only say that the double-foot guides stay put.
25
General Discussion / Single foot vs. snake line guides
« Last post by bluegillbob on August 15, 2014, 06:36:26 PM »
I have rods that have both line guide styles. My question is this: why aren't more rods available with single foot guides? Single foot guides have fewer wraps, lighter materials, and the like. A rod with single foot guides looks cleaner and has less "bumps" on the blank.

Peace,

Robert
26
Warmwater Fly Fishing / Re: Level Fly Line
« Last post by bluegillbob on August 15, 2014, 05:54:40 PM »
Possum,

When I began my fly fishing journey, I used level fly lines. I was not aware of tapered fly leaders either. I caught fish, but my presentations were sloppy...and I probably turned off a few fish that became wise to my tactics! I suppose those $5 and $10 fly lines were cleverly disguised as "level" fly lines!

I encourage beginner fly fishers to purchase a decent fly line...somewhere starting at $40 or so. You'll get a better engineered line that'll outperform those lower quality lines.

Besides, those level fly lines are "high maintenance"...they need to be clean and lubed often! 

I consider level fly lines to be the "bias ply tires" of fly lines. I'll line my reel with a modern day line and enjoy the performance, lower maintenance, and appreciation of modern engineering and the tapers that were created. Level fly lines may turn some anglers on, but I've discovered other lines that work better for me.

Peace,

Robert 

27
Warmwater Fly Fishing / Re: Level Fly Line
« Last post by Dave R on August 15, 2014, 01:23:01 PM »
Thank you Tom for the all the information you have given. However, as I said, I'm interested in warm water applications which don't include trout. There are few chances for me to get to fish for trout.

Something else to think about is that if level lines were all that great, the major fly line companies would still make them.

I do a lot of warmwater fly fishing and I could not even imagine using a level line. The advantage of a taper for warm water is to be able to turn over a big bug or heavy fly. I use both Bass Bug taper and standard weight forward line.

I don't have the casting expertise that Tom has, but I have been fly fishing a very, very long time and I would not even consider using a level line other than the examples he has given.

Just my 2 cents.

Dave
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Warmwater Fly Fishing / Re: Level Fly Line
« Last post by Tom Jindra on August 15, 2014, 12:42:42 PM »
You misunderstand. I am not discussing trout fishing. I'm discussing your requirement for a delicate presentation. Any line delicate enough for those spring creek trout is certainly delicate enough for any other species in any other water. Level lines simply do not meet the standard. Level lines can't even compete with standard tapers for delicacy.

To be clear: I can out-geek most people when it comes to fly-casting and fly tackle. And anyone who tells you that a level line is more delicate than a tapered line -- whether for bass, bream, trout or anything else -- is wrong.

You should buy level lines for budget reasons only, never for performance. The only exceptions are for running lines with shooting heads or for building your own tapers.
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Warmwater Fly Fishing / Re: Level Fly Line
« Last post by Possumpoint on August 15, 2014, 11:42:10 AM »
Thank you Tom for the all the information you have given. However, as I said, I'm interested in warm water applications which don't include trout. There are few chances for me to get to fish for trout.
30
Warmwater Fly Fishing / Re: Level Fly Line
« Last post by Tom Jindra on August 15, 2014, 07:28:23 AM »
Yes, level lines fell out of favor long ago, because the performance is inferior to tapered lines. Their primary advantage is price, i.e. they're really inexpensive. In small diameters, they are also useful as running lines for shooting heads, and they can be used for building your own tapers.

I've not seen you cast, so I can't say why you found no improvement using tapered lines. But you're not going to find level lines being used by any of the top fly-fishermen, certainly not by any tournament casters for either distance or accuracy.

If delicacy is your goal, level lines cannot compare to a standard taper, let alone a specialty taper. Delicacy is why tapers were first developed. I.e., instead of having a heavy section of level line splatting down on the water, the line was tapered down to a delicate tip to minimize the impact.

Yes, a tapered line by definition pushes additional weight back to the belly as it takes weight out of the tip. But Teeny's Gary LaFontaine line has a front taper of about 8 feet. That means with a 9-foot leader, you don't get into the heavy belly until you're casting at least 17 feet. The Royal Wulff Triangle Taper has an even longer front taper, as much as 40 feet for some applications.

The acid test for delicacy is the spring creeks outside Livingston, Mont. The trout on those creeks get hit hard every year by many of the world's best anglers, so the fish are as spooky and as educated as a fish can get. Long leaders and lines with long front tapers are the standard there. I challenge anybody to find an angler using a level line on any of those creeks, unless he's doing it on a dare.

Does that mean you can't catch fish with a level line? Of course not. Just don't be deceived into thinking those lines offer any advantage in performance. Level lines will save you some money, but that's it.
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